Sunday, August 5, 2007

Naturopathic Homeopathic Vitalism Claimed as Science-Based - Bastyr 08-2007:

Naturopathic Homeopathic Vitalism Claimed as Science-Based - Bastyr 08-2007:
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[youtube video slideshow of this text at bottom of this page]
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i. As 'reported' in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer 08-01-2007 -- in a column whereby "each week, Bastyr University faculty provides a weekly healthy lifestyle tip [...] in a special Bastyr feature called 'Alternative Medicine' (at http://www.bastyr.edu/news/news.asp?N... ) -- by "Nancy Mercer, N.D.[Bastyr], naturopathic physician specializing in homeopathy and an adjunct faculty member, Bastyr University" in an article titled "Alternative Medicine: Homeopathy and Children" (click here, http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/health/... ):
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"how does it work? Homeopathy turns on the 'self heal" switch. Chinese medicine calls it the 'chi.' Naturopathic medicine calls it the 'vis.' Homeopathy calls it the 'vital force.' They all describe the energy inhabiting the human body that when stimulated moves the human system toward greater health [...] Bastyr is a non-profit, private university offering graduate and undergraduate degrees, with a multidisciplinary curriculum in science-based natural medicine."
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Note: Here, Bastyr is stating that naturopathic medicine's 'purposeful life spirit' (for further references concerning naturopathic vitalism, see http://thevitalismofnaturopathy.blogs... ) is a scientific fact in the context of journalism. The three professional ethical systems which are involved here are those of medicine, academic science and journalism. With medical, journalistic and scientific authority, Bastyr is stating that naturopathy's 'purposeful life spirit' is science-based. The particular science-language used is "energy," (for actual energy, see http://www.csicop.org/sb/9806/reality... ), then equated with "self heal switch," "chi," "vis" [aka power: short form of vis medicatrix naturae, the healing power of nature in Latin], and "vital force."
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ii. Bastyr University's College of Naturopathy's 2006-2007 catalog states Bastyr's vitalism as well (at http://web.archive.org/web/2007031422... ):
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"Naturopathic Clinical Theory 1-2. These classes are organized to aid each student's development of a comprehensive and personal understanding of what it means to be a naturopathic physician. Emphasis is placed on discussion and critical evaluation. Students examine naturopathic medicine in the context of medicine today and explore the art of medicine and the integration of philosophy with knowledge gained in the basic sciences [...] NM5131 Naturopathic Clinical Theory 1. 2 credits [...] introduces the philosophy of naturopathic medicine, from its historical origins to the present day. Naturopathic principles of practice, concepts of health and disease, environment, natural hygiene, nature cure, the vis medicatrix naturae, naturopathic therapeutics, prevention and wellness, and other topics are explored. The therapeutic order is introduced. The vitalistic context of science-based, modern naturopathic medicine is emphasized. See NM7115 for Naturopathic Clinical Theory 2 description. Prerequisite: admission to naturopathic medicine program [...] NM5136 The Vis Medicatrix Naturae. 1.5 credits. Naturopathic medicine's core clinical principle, the vis medicatrix naturae, is shared by traditional systems of medicine throughout the world. This course explores clinical research, writings and techniques from various systems of medicine which incorporate nature's influence on healing, the nature of the healing processes, and the vital or life force. The course introduces the clinical application of techniques to restore health, prevent illness and optimize wellness by respecting and augmenting the vis medicatrix naturae. Prerequisite: NM5131."
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Note: "The vis" "the vital or life force" is "naturopathic medicine's core clinical principle [p.108]." Bastyr's "integration of philosophy with knowledge gained in the basic sciences" literally means 'the blending of the overarching vitalistic with aspects of the scientific,' per "vitalistic context of science-based, modern naturopathic medicine."
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iii. Critical evaluation:
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iii.01. Science rejects the vitalistic [naturopathy's 'purposeful life spirit'](see http://novfsinscience.blogspot.com/ ).

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Note: I do not see how it is ethical in terms of science to label / pose the 'scientifically -rejected, -ejected, and -unsupported' as the scientific. Science preponderantly rejects the supernatural, vitalistic, teleological and metaphysical as science-based, and has for decades.
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iii.02. Journalism demands, according to the Society of Professional Journalists' ethical code, which is "voluntarily embraced by thousands of writers, editors and other news professionals" (at http://www.spj.org/ethicscode.asp ):
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"members of the Society of Professional Journalists believe that public enlightenment is the forerunner of justice and the foundation of democracy. The duty of the journalist is to further those ends by seeking truth and providing a fair and comprehensive account of events and issues [...] to serve the public with thoroughness and honesty. Professional integrity is the cornerstone of a journalist's credibility. Members of the Society share a dedication to ethical behavior and adopt this code to declare the Society's principles and standards of practice [...] journalists should: test the accuracy of information from all sources and exercise care to avoid inadvertent error. Deliberate distortion is never permissible [...] make certain that headlines, news teases and promotional material, photos, video, audio, graphics, sound bites and quotations do not misrepresent [...] distinguish between advocacy and news reporting. Analysis and commentary should be labeled and not misrepresent fact or context [...] distinguish news from advertising and shun hybrids that blur the lines between the two [...] ethical journalists treat sources, subjects and colleagues as human beings deserving of respect [...] journalists should be free of obligation to any interest other than the public's right to know. Journalists should [...] remain free of associations and activities that may compromise integrity or damage credibility [...and must] deny favored treatment to advertisers and special interests and resist their pressure to influence news coverage [...and] be accountable. Journalists are accountable to their readers, listeners, viewers and each other [...] journalists should [...] expose unethical practices of journalists and the news media [...and] abide by the same high standards to which they hold others."
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Note: I do not see how it is ethical in the context of journalism -- particularly, here, in medical science reporting -- to represent what is not scientific as scientific (for Bastyr's running "science-based" claim in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, visit http://thesciencethataintscience.blog... ). 'Purposeful life spirit' as scientific is not truthful and fair. It is not comprehensive, thorough, or honest. In this sense, Bastyr's reporting of "the not scientific is scientific" oxymorony appears to be a form of malpractice {professional negligence}, in terms of academic science and science journalism. [much like http://www.wtnh.com/Global/story.asp?... ].
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(for further enlightenment, visit http://standtoyourduty.blogspot.com ).
(music by spaceScat, "warble" excerpt).
(also, take the "naturopathy blasphemy challenge," at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MudHSt... ).
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